Stunning 3D-Printed Pavilions Made from Recycled Plastic | Hassell Architecture Studio

Stunning 3D-Printed Pavilions Made from Recycled Plastic

Climate change and global plastic waste are having a major impact on architecture, necessitating more adaptive structures, both in their form and in the manufacturing process. Hassell architecture studio, Nagami 3D-printing studio and creative collective to.org responded by creating a 3D-printed pavilion made from recycled plastic. Know more about these enigmatic pavilions in detail below on SURFACES REPORTER (SR):

Inspiration behind the project

They took inspiration from Qarmaq, an inter-seasonal dwelling used by the Central Inuit of Northern Canada, and modified it to suit inclement weather in various regions worldwide.

The combination of traditional indigenous solutions plus technological modifications allows for alterations according to the site's needs.

Design Details

The shell-like design draws its impetus from conversations between Hassell's head of design, Xavier De Kestelier, and the founder of Nagami, a 3D-additive manufacturing studio - Manuel Jimenez Garcia. Its purpose is to make use of plastic refuse as a building resource.

De Kestelier notes the massive implications 3D printing has for architecture and hopes to benefit from this flexibility to build a pavilion that could be self-sufficient while adapting to different climates to reduce its carbon footprint.

The Pavilion 1, in all its potential applications, is currently only a prototype. To.org are looking for partners to support the project, enabling them to realise scalability. Manuel Jimenez Garcia, the founder of Nagami, has expressed optimism that the endeavour will not only revolutionise the building sector but also motivate future architects to invest in sustainable development when designing for tomorrow's habitats.

Source: Hassell Architecture Studio

 

Keep reading SURFACES REPORTER for more such news stories.

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